May 2013 fishing report

 This 6lb rainbow was coaxed onto the bank of Well Lake by a very happy Jake Knott from Battle 

 This 6lb rainbow was coaxed onto the bank of Well Lake by a very happy Jake Knott from Battle 

I’ve come to the conclusion that there are two things we have a real duty to teach our children, swimming and fishing. The swimming is an obvious one, but the reason for fishing may not be as clearly defined in the art of survival. If you will allow me to quote from a book I am sure many of you have read, “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” by Paul Torday. His character, the sheik declares, “There is one group of people who in their passion for their sport ignore all things to do with class”. He states all anglers “are united and stand together on the river bank and speak freely and without restraint or self-consciousness”. To me this sums up so very precisely the joy of angling and in particular, fly fishing. 

In what other sport could you ever find a brick layer chatting harmoniously with a barrister, or a lorry driver swapping stories with a doctor? Where would you ever find a mum of three (still in active service) joined in a common goal elbow to elbow with a World War Two fighter pilot (retired)? Fishing cannot fail to bring people together. It is impossible not to talk to the angler next to you on the water’s edge. You are compelled to communicate with your fellow “hunter-gatherer”. This sociable side to angling is an altogether natural progression, an inevitable consequence and one I believe not found in other sports. Many others are sociable but in a different way. They are perhaps not suitable for children or women or not possible for the elderly or physically restricted and entered into often for the wrong reasons, a means-to-an-end type of interaction, or so it seems to me. Whilst we fish in our own space on the bank and cast over our own stretch of water and are lost in a world of personal concentration and meditation we are still happy and quick to come to the aid of a comrade in need of assistance with help to land a fish or the loan of a pair of snipers, and then to offer a sociable “have you tried this fly…” or “do you fancy a cup of coffee…?”. 

 Paul Gietzen with his first ever fish helped by the experienced Fred Mitchell at Brick Farm’s fly fishing taster evening

 Paul Gietzen with his first ever fish helped by the experienced Fred Mitchell at Brick Farm’s fly fishing taster evening

We are pleased to say that the weather, (after a winter that forced me to carpet my chicken run for the first time) has at last allowed us to repair the disabled platform in front of the lodge. It was immediately put to good use in the first week by two anglers in wheelchairs. We were very happy to see them able to enjoy a morning’s fly fishing in safety. 

The banks of the new lake have now been grass seeded and the construction of the fishing platforms starts shortly. We have also begun to plant some small trees and shrubs in suitable areas to “soften” the landscaping. We now hope to start stocking the new lake later this Autumn. You can follow developments with up-dated photos on Facebook.

 The Masonic Fishing Charity volunteer coaches and helpers

 The Masonic Fishing Charity volunteer coaches and helpers

 Nicola Sangyard from Crowborough with a beautiful 5lb 10oz

 Nicola Sangyard from Crowborough with a beautiful 5lb 10oz

On the 14th May we were happy to host a charity day held by the Masonic Fishing Charity and organised by the tireless Brian Raw who, with the generous support of many qualified coaches entertained and taught 17 young people with special needs in the art of fly fishing. A great day out for those involved especially for Nicola Sangyard from Crowborough who caught a beautiful 5lb 10oz rainbow with a Blue Flash Damsel on a floating line. We are well suited here at Brick Farm with our impressive oak framed lodge to host groups for fly fishing outings with hire of tackle possible and tuition if needed. Just call us for ideas and details.

We continue to regularly stock browns and rainbows in tip top condition and have recently added a few BIG surprises for your entertainment and exercise!

Graham Large bags a 5lb rainbowon the surface with an Orange Cats Whisker

Graham Large bags a 5lb rainbowon the surface with an Orange Cats Whisker

Looking back through the returns book I see all the usual flies have been working well but in particular Damsels and Buzzers. New flies this month I see include Shrimp Flies.  Recent rainbow catches include a 6lb by Jake Knott from Battle, a 5lb by Graham Large from London on an Orange Cats Whisker using a floating line, a 5lb by Mr Gartland on a Small Black Tadpole, a 3lb 12oz by John Catt from Tonbridge on a Green Buzzer, a 3lb 11oz by David Wood from Polegate on a Black & Green and a 4lb by Shian Fan from Eastbourne.

Dry flies as expected are starting to produce some lovely fish and brilliant fun now with the fish higher up in the water, feeding hungrily. Well Lake in particular is fishing well in the early evening. The fish rising up like dolphin, moving quickly around the lake picking up the insect life on the top of the crystal clear spring water…so high time we, I’m including myself here, made the effort to break free of our daily routine and come down for some evening fishing or even the other end of the day, early morning, to make the most of this all-too-short time of the year when the daylight hours are at their longest. The lodge is open later at this time of the year for your convenience and we also take credit cards (including over the phone) and sell gift vouchers for special occasions such as Father’s Day on Sunday 16th June.

A 3lb 12oz rainbow caught by a fit John Catt on a Green Buzzer

A 3lb 12oz rainbow caught by a fit John Catt on a Green Buzzer

Signing off for another month I wish you tight lines for June and urge you all to enjoy the end of the Spring and beginning of Summer in all its glory and who knows there may well be that BIG one waiting for you at Brick Farm!